How to Plan a Holiday

Where To Go

The (obvious) first thing you have to do is decide where you want to go.

This can be easy or it can be difficult, and it depends on a range of factors. Some questions to ask yourself: How much time off do you have? What is your budget? Do you have a bucketlist? Are you traveling with anyone? What kind of weather do you want? Do you care about a language barrier? The answers to these types of questions can help you narrow down your search. If you do need some inspiration, Googling or Pinteresting things like “places to holiday in the sun” or “unusual holiday destinations” or “places to holiday on a budget” etc., etc. At the beginning of the year, I wrote this post all about ideas of where to travel this year, so if you’re stuck maybe it can help.

Personally, I have a bucketlist of places I want to visit. Some of these places are close, some far, some budget, some expensive. My bucketlist could be broken down into sub-bucketlists, if you will. For example, there are certain vacations that I want to put off taking until I have enough money saved up or am in a comfortable enough financial state to justify splashing out a bit – such as doing a long U.S. roadtrip, an African safari tour, or Australia. These are places where what I want to do will cost more money because of the exchange rate, the time I want to spend there, and the types of activities I want to do. Of course, there are ways to make each of these holidays budget, but I don’t want to. So, I will wait until I’m a bit older and have more money. In the meantime, there are other places on my bucketlist that make sense for where I’m at financially right now – Croatia, Spain, Thailand, and Austria.

So you know where you want to go – Great! Some questions to ask yourself once you’ve picked a place: Will you need a visa? Will you need vaccines? Are there travel advisories? Should you buy travel insurance? These questions aren’t fun ones, but they are important questions. Make sure to do the research about your destination so you don’t get turned away at the gate. Here’s a great resource from the British government that can help you answer these questions and more.

Stopped in Sedona, Arizona on my 10-day road trip from Ohio to California.

How To Get There

Now that you have picked a destination, you need to book travel.

It’s possible that this was part of the process for picking where you want to travel to. For example, the trains across Europe are convenient and a “green” way to travel, but they may take more time than flying. Are you going to drive? In the U.S., driving is the common mode of transportation (as most cities don’t have convenient public transport, some have none at all), but if you’re travelling in London driving doesn’t make much sense (public transport gets an A+).

If you’re looking to fly less (yay environment), then picking a destination closer to home may be better, or picking a destination that has good public transport is also a good option. If you have to fly but feel like you still want to do something for the environment, you could carbon offset your trip through companies like this one.

For booking flights, here is my guide. It varies depending on the time of year you travel – summer dates always cost more because it’s peak season. To get around this, you can book in reverse, meaning November – March is summer in the southern hemisphere so book warm vacations then to beat some peak prices.

London, UK

Where To Stay

I usually book accommodation after I book travel. Some questions to ask yourself: Do I want to stay in a hostel? What is my budget? How close to X do I want to stay? Is there a part of town I should not stay in for safety reasons? What kind of experience do I want? Who am I traveling with?

Hostels will most likely be the cheapest option, they can provide a social space, and are great for solo travelers or small groups. They can come with downsides – loud roommates, dirty (with so many people using the facilities this can happen), cheap (you get what you pay for). I suggest looking at the reviews on Hostel World.

Hotels can be great and can range in prices. Hotels can also be dodgy – looking at reviews on websites like hotels.com and booking.com can help you weed out the bad ones. Hotels offer dining services and amenities (wifi, gym, pool, offices, printing, luggage storage, laundry, etc.), but can be isolating for solo travelers. For families or large groups, hotels are a great option.

Airbnb or home stays are also great options. Especially for groups bigger than two. In some places, Airbnb can be just as budget as hostels or just as expensive as hotels. Again, please read the reviews! So far, I have only had positive experiences with Airbnb, but that’s not always the case so definitely read the reviews. Also, more so for Airbnbs than hostels, you really tend to get what you paid for (relatively speaking per city).

Usually I do some research into all three options, especially if I’m traveling with someone/people. If I’m traveling solo, I tend to opt for hostels for the social aspect. Compare prices, amenities, locations, and reviews to get to the sweet spot for what you want to book.

Booked the Eiffel Tower in advance (saves money!).

What To Do

Some people are more spontaneous than others and don’t book anything ahead of time. Depending on where you are going, there may be some attractions that you have to book ahead of time, or that you will want to book ahead of time to avoid massive queues (like the Vatican Museums). In April, I’m going to a surf camp in Costa Rica – something I definitely had to book in advance, but I don’t have any other plans for my time there.

If you’re going for a specific purpose than obviously book ahead. Also major tourist attractions, I suggest you book ahead – such as the Eiffel Tower. Or, try to plan your days so you do the biggest tourist attractions in the morning to beat the long queues and then leave the rest of the day for wandering around exploring and being “spontaneous”. Or throw all caution to the wind, show up, and do you! It really depends on the type of traveler you are – Do you like to be prepared? Are you a planner? Do you want to pack in as much as possible? Are you going for only a short period of time? Are you going for quality or quantity? Is there anything you’re dying to do at your destination?

It also helps to be on the same page as anyone you are traveling with. For example, my best friend Emma and I went to Paris for four days – we are both planners and booked what we needed to in advance and made a general plan for the rest of the days to make sure we saw everything we wanted to. And we saw it all. That type of trip would have driven my boyfriend, Conor, insane. He is more the spontaneous type, doesn’t need to be awake at 7am every morning of the holiday, and likes to see what local gems we can stumble across. Both are amazing people to travel with. Knowing what type of traveler you’re traveling with and making compromises is essential to enjoying your holiday!

And there you have it – my ultimate guide to booking a holiday! Most of the time, planning my holiday happens in this order, but as you read the categories sometimes overlap or affect another. In order to keep track of everything, I keep everything I’ve book in a note on my computer (flight information, accommodation info and contact details, all confirmation numbers, and links to any websites) and flag any important emails (printing only what is necessary). I hope this helps you to have a great holiday!

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Read the reviews!
  2. Understand the type of people you’re traveling with and adjust accordingly.
  3. Book the big tourist attractions in advance.
All around enjoying waking up at 7am to beat the Colosseum queues.

Guide to Your First Hostel Stay

I stayed in my first hostel in Kyiv with my boyfriend, but recently had my first experience in a hostel while traveling solo in Rome. I enjoyed both stays immensely and will definitely give more hostels a chance in the future. There are a few questions you should ask yourself before you decide to stay in a hostel. How many people are you traveling with? What kind of accommodation experience do you want? Are you comfortable sharing a room with strangers? Are you a light sleeper? Is the cheapest option the best option? Other alternatives to hostels are hotels, Airbnb, homestays, and motels. Additionally, a private room in a hostel is usually more expensive than an Airbnb or hotel. If you want the social aspect of hostels with the privacy, then a private room makes sense. If you just want a private room and the best value for money, a hostel might not make sense.

Other factors to consider are location, dorms, and booking:

Make sure you research the area you want to stay in – for the good and the bad. One highly rated hostel in Rome is also on one of the more dangerous streets near the station. Since I was a lone female traveler, I chose not to stay at that hostel and chose to stay at another highly rated hostel on the other side of the station in a safer area. Granted, I based the safety of the area of extensive research of online reviews, but since I had never stayed in Rome before this was all I had to go off of. And it turned out, my hostel was in a safe neighbourhood and I never had any problems.

For dorms, I chose an all-female dorm (four beds) in Rome because I feel safer around women when I am alone than men. You may feel differently or the same, so it’s always good to check the room options a hostel has. In Kyiv, Conor and I stayed in a two-bed ‘private’ dorm. All hostels differ on what they provide, so shop around a bit to find what works best for you.

Finally, when booking, I suggest booking direct with the hostel. I do my research on sites like HostelWorld or Booking.com, but when it’s time to book I reach out to the hostel directly to get the best rate. That may be unfair of me as I used HostelWorld for its resources to then not book through them, but the added fees add up for a budget traveler. Skips the fees, book direct.

Things you MUST bring if you want to have a good stay: Lock, Ear Plugs, Day Bag

Be courteous, but expect that it’s not a hotel: For example, don’t be that person who snoozes their alarm from 6am to 8am – it’s just rude. Make sure to cleanup after yourself in the bathrooms and kitchen, don’t be loud late at night, don’t turn the lights on early in the morning, etc. Most of this you already know, but it makes the stay so much better if you’re conscious of how your behaviour affects the other guests. Unfortunately, there are times when you get stuck in a room with a rude guest who snoozes their alarm, leaves puddles on the bathroom floor, or comes in at 3am yelling and stomping around. If it’s a short stay, try to take it in stride (maybe add eye mask to the list of things to bring just in case). If it’s a long stay and you’re really not happy – talk to the person (nicely), talk to your host, or pack up and find somewhere else to stay – whatever it takes for you to have a good holiday.

Last but certainly not least, be social. Besides the low rates, most people book hostels because they want to be social while traveling, have people to talk to, or have people to do things with. So hang out in the common rooms, talk to you roommates, and ask the host for recommendations. It can be awkward at first, but I found reading in the common room to be a good way to start. It allows you to be doing something if no one is in the common room and it allows you to just exist in the space while you work up the courage to talk to other travelers. This worked for me in Rome where I met two other Americans and we made plans for dinner. In Kyiv, the hostel was a bit more social with a bar so it was easy to approach people in that setting. Staying in a hostel is a great way to make friends who want to see the sights with you or do an excursion – while staying in a hostel in La Paz, Conor met a fellow traveler to climb a mountain with! People you meet in hostels can become friends you keep in touch with for a long time.

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Do your research to find the best fit for you.
  2. Bring ear plugs!
  3. Hang out in the common rooms to make travel friends.

5 Essential Travel Apps

Smartphones make traveling easier than ever before. On one device you have all the information you need to plan a trip, buy flights, decide where to eat, translate a language, entertain yourself, and so much more. There are some apps that are must-have’s when traveling to make everything seamless. Here are my top five:

Google Translate – If you’re visiting a foreign country with a different language, this is a must. You can download the language so you can access it offline as well – no need to waste data or search for cafes with wi-fi only. I’ve used this in the Ukraine, Italy, Greece, France, and Germany, and have been thankful for it every time. Not only does it allow me to communicate with people who don’t speak English, but I can translate museum plaques, restaurant menus, street signs, instructions, etc.

Google Maps Offline – This is a lifesaver in places where you don’t want to use data, or if you don’t have any data, you don’t need wi-fi to use it. You can download Google Maps of where you are, say Rome, and use it like you would regularly use Google Maps just without the internet. It is seriously a lifesaver!

City Mapper – This app is all about public transport and showing you the best options and the times for each option. I even use this locally in London to catch the bus. It can be even more helpful in a city that you’re unfamiliar with. I used City Mapper in France and Italy recently which was especially helpful given all the signs are in a foreign language. If you plan on using the public transportation system, I recommend this app.

TripAdvisor – I rely on TripAdvisor for the reviews of restaurants, attractions, cafes, hostels, hotels, etc. For the most part (there’s always an exception), TripAdvisor is a reliable source and can be helpful when looking for recommendations in a foreign city.

Airline App – As in, whichever airline you are traveling with. I always download the app once I book tickets (Ryanair, British Airways, United, etc). Usually, you’re able to access your boarding pass on the app, track your frequent flyer status and rewards, and make changes to your booking. Also, and annoyingly, many medium haul flights don’t have in flight entertainment systems and airlines now use their app to give you entertainment options. I say annoyingly because I feel like a flight from San Francisco to New York should have in-flight entertainment in the back of seats but not every airline agrees. Thus, the app. You can download it on your tablet as well and log onto the website on your laptop during the flight. Having the airline app makes your travel smoother and more seamless, so I definitely recommend it.

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Download only what’s necessary.
  2. Check local guides for more specific apps.
  3. Remember to charge your phone!

Bonus – Other Useful Apps: Instagram (for sharing pictures, obviously), Mobile Banking, Weather, Kindle (or other book app), SafeTrek (or similar), and Uber (or another ride-share/taxi app).

4 Days in Rome

Back in October, I wrote a blog, 5 Days In Rome in Under £300. This is the follow up to my trip to Rome in December and how I managed to stick to that budget along with a superstar 4 day itinerary (day 5 is travel only so I don’t really count it). Since it was my first time to Rome I enlisted the help of Lonely Planet and borrowed their guide to Rome from my roommate.

Overview:

Flights: £25

Hostel: £85

Restaurants: £122

Attractions: £30

Transport: £15

Total Spent: £277

Itinerary:

Day One: Thursday

Flight: London (STN) to Rome (Ciampino) – 13:20 – 16:45

After arriving at Ciampino, I booked a roundtrip bus ticket for £8 that would drop me off at the Termini metro station and in four days I would take it back to the airport. My hostel, the Beehive Hostel, was only a couple blocks from Termini so this made the most sense. It was also the cheapest option for transport and didn’t involve any additional stops or changes. I can be really terrible with directions and public transport sometimes so this was the best option for my own sanity as well.

I arrived to the Beehive when it was dark and had to wait only a few minutes to be let into the electronically locked door to reception. Linda, one of the owners, greeted me and took me through check-in. Much to my chagrin, I booked through HostelWorld, which was more expensive than if I had booked directly. For the future, I will use HostelWorld as a guide to find a great hostel, but will be contacting hostels directly to see if they offer a better price. If they don’t, I’ll book through HostelWorld, but otherwise I am a budget traveler. Throughout the check-in process Linda was very helpful, showing me places to visit on a map and the Beehive app which has all their local recommendations. In all, I would definitely recommend the Beehive for any travelers who are looking for a clean hostel with great service. The only downside was the lack of social life at the hostel, as I only met one person in the common room the whole time I was there. This could be because it was the off season for traveling. If you don’t want somewhere too social, this would be perfect. In all, I really enjoyed my stay and definitely recommend.

After checking in to my hostel and settling in the room, it was too late to see any attractions, and being my first solo trip, I went out to dinner at the restaurant next to my hostel – Ristorante Regina. It had the most delicious ravioli I have ever tasted. A great recommendation from the owners of the Beehive Hostel. Then it was off to bed for an early wakeup the next morning.

Day Two: Friday

Knowing the Colosseum and the Vatican would have the longest lines, I decided to put them at the beginning of two of the days. First up, the Colosseum because I couldn’t resist.

I would recommend getting to the Colosseum early – I arrived at 8am for an 8:30am opening time. I did not reserve tickets beforehand. The line for no tickets was already 100 people deep by the time the gates opened. I was the first one inside though so getting there early definitely paid off (I got in free with my ICOM card). I spent about two hours in the Colosseum, walking around each level and viewing the exhibits. One of the exhibits tells the entire history of the Colosseum from inception to present day. It was interesting to learn about its different uses, owners, and repairs. The entire place was full a feeling that’s hard to describe – like the history of it was seeping from the walls. It was really quiet in the morning which gave me space to immerse myself in the atmosphere and imagine what it would have been like two thousand years ago. As a previous classics student, I have been wanting to visit the Colosseum for years and it lived up to its hype. It’s an absolutely incredible feat of architecture, engineering, and culture.

As a solo traveler, I took some selfies, but also asked other tourists if they could take my picture. I’m usually selective when handing my phone over to a stranger. Typically, I pick someone who is about my age and female – female because other girls usually know how to take really great pictures and will get all the angles. In return, I take their picture so it all works out.

After the Colosseum, I walked across the road to Palatine Hill, my ticket from the Colosseum also got me into this historic site. There was no line at all at this point but behind me there were a couple hundred people in line for the Colosseum, further evidence of why you should do the Colosseum first thing in the morning. I walked through the ruins of the emperor’s palace first. There are a ton of plaques to tell you what you’re looking at. I also had the Lonely Planet guide with a map inside which helped me to navigate as well. The palace was unusually quiet for how late in the morning it was, but that made the experience more special. What a unique and odd thing to be wandering the site of one of the greatest men in the world history, imagine walking on the same mosaic tiles as an emperor. It was hard to wrap my head around that fact, still is. The grounds are massive so it took me about an hour to wander the whole thing, ending at the balcony overlooking the Roman Forum.

It took me a little bit of work to get down to the Roman Forum, but once I did, I was not disappointed. It was significantly more crowded down there with tons of school groups messing about. But that’s how the Forum is meant to be, busy and bustling with the daily crowd going about their business. I was once tested on the layout of the forum, having to draw it from memory and label every building. It was really cool to see that come to life and to remember most of the buildings, only needing the guide a few times. Have I mentioned yet that everything is massive? The scale of buildings and temples is unreal.

For lunch, I headed across the street from the Forum, Imperiale Ristorante. I ordered a delicious pizza and glass of wine. It was definitely touristy, but it was convenient and had a great patio so I could still marvel at the Roman Forum.

After that I headed over to the Capitoline Museums. The walk was gorgeous taking me past the Altar of the Fatherland.

The museum itself wasn’t as crowded as I expected. There was no line and most of the galleries were empty except for a couple people here and there. I enjoyed the quiet and relaxed feel – very different to some other tourists spots. I love Greek and Roman sculptures and art, so I really enjoyed this museum. It only costs 1 euro with my ICOM card – otherwise there is a higher entrance fee.

I walked down the road a bit to a small coffee and sweet shop called San Teo. I was recommended this place by the Lonely Planet guide, and as I’m a total sweet tooth and it was close by, I had to check it out. It definitely didn’t disappoint. The staff were lovely and kind and the desserts were delicious (I had three to hit the 5 euro card minimum, but so worth it).

After this, it was getting late so I took a bus back to my hostel. I wasn’t sure how the buses worked at this point and didn’t know how to buy a ticket. I assumed I could do so when getting on the bus – I was wrong. You have to buy a ticket from a shop or a station and then put it in the ticket machine on the bus to get it stamped. Technically, you could ride the bus without a ticket but if you get caught the fine is steep. So from then on, I bought my tickets at the Termini station in the morning.

For dinner on Friday, I went to Mama Angela Trattoria – another recommendation the the Beehive’s app. It was so good! I was sad to be eating alone only because I didn’t have anyone to share in how good the food was. I ordered bruschetta and popcorn fried gnocchi with a glass of white wine. The waitstaff were very friendly and recommended wine for me. They made me feel less awkward for sitting alone which endeared me to them. I would definitely go back!

Day Three: Saturday

A couple weeks prior to my trip, I booked a guided tour of the Vatican Museums, including the Sistine Chapel and St. Peter’s Basilica. I would highly recommend booking a guided tour. Mine started at 8:30am and the museum was already packed. When I arrived at the Vatican at 8am, it was pretty empty, so I was able to take advantage of that and get some fun pictures with barely anyone else in them. The guided tours are offered in multiple languages and are very thorough. In total, it was a three hour tour. We spent the first hour and a half walking through the museums, stopping at well known or historically important objects. My tour guide was very knowledgable and gave us a bunch of fun facts along with the history of the objects. The Sistine Chapel was breathtaking – luckily I was able to get a seat along the wall so I could relax and take my time looking up at the ceiling, mesmerised by the scenes. I would have loved to experience the Sistine Chapel with less people in it, but it was still cool. Next we moved in St. Peter’s Basilica, which was ridiculously big. The sheer grandeur of the inside took my breath away – I’m still astonished at HOW. But, that’s the Catholic Church for you – they really know how to go all out. Again, our tour guide took us around the most famous parts of it, stopping to see one of the Popes mummified and on display. A bit weird, but cool at the same time.

After the Vatican, I walked to Piazza Novona, passing Castel Sant’Angelo. I stopped for a tea and croissant at a little cafe on a side street near the piazza. There was a Christmas market on the piazza so I walked around that for a little bit, sat on a bench, and enjoyed people watching. I then walked to the Pantheon, and was again astonished at the sheer size of it! However, I was disappointed when I entered it, which is entirely my own fault for not Googling it beforehand. I am a huge Greek and Roman history buff, so to find out that the Pantheon has been completely converted to a Catholic church – no sign of any Roman gods or religion whatsoever. Disappointing, but at the same time, the only reason its still standing is because the Catholic Church saved it from destruction. I then went for lunch at a wine bar/cafe called Taverna Capranica- I had a delicious cheese board and selection of wine. It was a little off the beaten track, so not as crowded with tourists, but still close enough to the Pantheon to attract tourists.

After lunch, I headed over to the Trevi Fountain, another must see attraction. I’m sure you’re tired of this by now, but again it’s massive. It’s way bigger than I thought it was going to be! And so intricate. Really a spectacular sight to see. I asked a couple of girls to take some pictures of me throwing a coin into the fountain – I needed a couple of takes to get the shot I was looking for so I threw a couple of coins into the fountain. If you’re wondering, the money is collected on a daily basis and donated to a Catholic charity – about 3,000 euros per day. Crazy. I sat at the fountain for awhile, watching other people take pictures and interact. It was interesting and funny and a nice break from the long day I’d had.

I took the bus back to the hostel and rested for a bit before heading down to the common room. I met another American who was traveling with his brother. We decided to get dinner together at another restaurant recommended by the hostel – Bramble Bar and Kitchen. I had a vegetable pizza and glass of wine and we shared some bruschetta. It was delicious! (So good in fact I went back the next night). It was really fun, as my first time solo traveling, to make some new travel friends from my hostel. It felt like the last missing part of the ‘real’ hostel experience.

Day Four: Sunday

I had breakfast in my hostel this morning – taking a bit more time than the last two days since I didn’t have anywhere I needed to be at 8am. I then went to Baths of Caracalla – ruins on the other side of Palatine Hill across the street from Circus Maximus. These ruins used to be the massive public baths of Rome. You’re able to walk through the entire structure with great informational plaques detailing what each room was and the people that visited, along with the types of activities to do there. The ruins are more overgrown than some others, but there is still a lot of stonework and architecture to see. It was really quiet as well, which made for a really nice morning walk.

My roommate from London flew in on Saturday night with another friend and was planning on staying a couple more days, so I met up with them on Sunday afternoon. I headed to the Spanish Steps to meet them for lunch. Little did I realise, it was December 8th, which is the Feast of the Immaculate Conception and the Pope visits the Spanish Steps on this day every year to lay a wreath at the monument. We were a bit early for that so we went to lunch at a restaurant around the corner. I had some more bruschetta and pasta with, you guessed it, a glass of wine. After lunch, we wandered over to the road where the Pope was supposed to come down, but it turns out he had already passed and was up near the steps doing his thing. We walked up that way when all of a sudden a black sedan drove past us with the window rolled down and the Pope waving to us out of it. I was expecting the Pope-mobile, so this was a shock. We ran along the side of the railing to get a better look and some videos. It was crazy because the street wasn’t even that crowded with people dying to see the Pope. It was definitely a rush of adrenaline, and it will forever be my fun fact.

For my last night in Rome, I went back to The Bramble and ordered their chocolate lava cake with ice cream and a hot tea. It was so good – I am a total sucker for a chocolate lava cake and this lived up to all my expectations! After that, I packed up and set my alarm for an early wake up call to catch my early flight back to London.

Day 5: Monday (Fly Day)

Rome (Ciampino) – London STN: 11:10am – 12:55pm

I took the same bus back to the airport from Termini Station, leaving at 7:10am, getting to the airport at 8am. I did get to the airport a bit too early – 3 hours was too early for such a small airport. But at least I didn’t miss my flight. Better to be early than sorry, right? Also, the next bus time was 8:30am and I thought that was cutting it a little close since I had never flown out of Ciampino. Now I know better, and so do you!

In all, this was the trip of a lifetime! Rome has been on my bucket list for ages and it lived up to all its expectations. As for my first solo trip, I wasn’t totally scarred and would definitely travel alone again. I’ll be writing a whole other post about solo travel, so stay tuned for that. I hope I could help you plan your dream trip to Rome. If you have any questions, drop a comment or fill out the contact form! Ciao!

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Plan ahead for the biggest attractions like the Colosseum and the Vatican.
  2. Ask the staff at your hostel/hotel for local recommendations.
  3. Wear comfy shoes!

How To Beat Jet Lag

If you have ever flown through different time zones, you may have suffered from jet lag – the groggy, tired, sick feeling you get for days after landing in your new destination. It gets worse the more time zones you travel through. Usually, jet lag doesn’t hit me too hard as I’ve learned some tricks over the years to mitigate it, but after experiencing the worst jet lag ever after my flight from San Francisco to London in December, I thought a refresher for how to beat jet lag is much over due.

Jet lag is worse flying west to east because you lose time, whereas flying east to west you gain time back. For some reason (I’m not a doctor or a biologist), the body’s circadian rhythm hates flying west to east which results in jet lag – symptoms include insomnia, fatigue, headaches, dehydration, nausea, indigestion, difficulty focusing, and others. This can be irritating when you’re supposed to be enjoying your vacation. Especially because it affects people differently. Where I had the worst jet lag ever, Conor felt almost no jet lag at all. Usually the symptoms go away within a few days or less depending on how many time zones you travelled through, what precautions you took, and sheer luck in some cases. Below are my best tips to beating jet lag so you can enjoy more of your vacation quicker.

Hydrate. It is so important to stay hydrated while flying, so it’s good practice to start hydrating before you’re even in the air. I carry a reusable water bottle with me so I can refill when I need to in airports, during layovers, and on board. It also helps to not consumer soft drinks or alcohol while flying as they are dehydrating. But, I know that’s not really feasible for everyone (one glass of wine helps put me to sleep), so I recommend off-setting any sodas or alcohol with water by ordering them at the same time.

Adjust to the new time zone as quick as possible. Your sleeping pattern is going to need adjustment so if you can start this early. Either before you leave by going to bed earlier or later depending on your final destination, or by adhering to your destination’s timing right away. If I am landing in the UK in the morning then I try to sleep as much as possible on the flight and not sleep after I land until that evening. If I am landing during the afternoon or evening, then I try to not to sleep at all on the flight so I’m tired when I land and can go straight to bed. Getting your circadian rhythm adjusted quicker helps mitigate the symptoms of jet lag. Pro tip: if you don’t want to sleep on the plane, book an aisle seat.

Move around. While on the plane, make sure to get up every hour or so and move around, even if it’s just to the bathroom. Moving around reduced stiffness and promotes mental alertness which can help ease symptoms of jet lag. It’s also healthy for you on long haul flights. I try to do a bit of yoga or stretching at the back of the plane or in the bathroom, as long as I’m out of the way, the flight attendants tend not to mind. It also gives me a chance to grab more water if I need it.

Disclaimer: sometimes I use sleeping medication, like melatonin, if I’m having insomnia and desperately need to get to bed. But I try not to because some don’t allow you to get into a good REM sleep and they can be habit-forming. Before going on any medication, obviously speak with your doctor.

And sometimes, you could have done everything right and still experience bad jet lag. In that case, be kind to yourself. At some point, it happens to everyone. Try to adjust your holiday plans to allow for a relaxed day on the first day, with some exercise. There isn’t treatment for jet lag, so just do the best you can with preventative measures.

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Keep a reusable water bottle with you.
  2. Be mindful when choosing seats – aisle if you don’t want to sleep, window if you do.
  3. Learn a few stretches to do in a plane seat, in the bathroom, or near the back of the plane.
Finally felt well enough for a trip to Borough Market to wine and dine.

Top 7 2020 Travel Destinations

There are many places in the world worth traveling to so this is by no means an exhaustive list. As well, it’s my list, so it is definitely biased. However, these are the places I want to visit is 2020 and it could help you find inspiration for your 2020 travels. I already know I won’t make it to all these places this year, but I’ve picked them based on a few factors – new continents, new cities, new countries, new skills I want to learn, budget, and time. I would be traveling from London which also skews the destinations I’ve chosen, but we’re all on the same planet so it doesn’t matter where you’re flying from you can still reach every place on this list. As always, I’ll sprinkle in my top tips for booking travel and must do’s.

Costa Rica

My main reason for wanting to go to Costa Rica is for the surfing. I have always wanted to learn and there are some seriously great areas on the west coast of Costa Rica for surfing. Conor and I are planning a spring trip to Witch’s Rock Surf Camp – a highly reviewed and recommended surf camp that includes accommodation, airport transfer, breakfast, daily lessons, surfing seminars and workshops, end of week road trip, and as much use of their surfboards as I want. If we have time to extend our trip, we want to spend a few days in the interior of the country exploring the Arenal Volcano area – possibly ziplining or hiking to waterfalls. Unfortunately, I have a limited number of vacation days and need to be strategic so for that reason we’re limiting the trip to two weeks. If you’re a girl and you want recommendations for travel destinations check out Girls LOVE Travel on Facebook (it’s a private group and boys aren’t allowed – sorry folks, but I’m sure there are more inclusive travel groups on Facebook to join!). I’ve seen non-stop flights from London on British Airways for under £500 roundtrip – not bad for flying halfway around the world.

Brussels, Belgium

This one is a little closer to home, so would be a fun weekend trip. The Eurostar from London is £59 roundtrip to Brussels – if you’re flexible with your travel dates, this is a budget friendly option. I like this option because the travel is more environmentally friendly than flying. Also, I get to see the different landscapes of England, France, and Belgium. I’ve never been to Belgium so this would be another new country and culture. Brussels has some incredible architecture (Grand Palace, Palais Royal, Parc Du Cinquantenaire) as well as cool museums and some lesser known history. For a weekend away, this would be a great trip.

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague (and Budapest below) have been on my European bucketlist for awhile. From London, they are relatively cheap to get to thanks to budget airlines like Ryanair and EasyJet. Additionally, once in country, it can be a relatively inexpensive holiday. This makes it an appealing choice for a young, working professional on an entry-level salary. Prague is fascinating to me for its history, architecture, and culture – top sights and things to do would be the Lennon Wall, KGB Museum, Astronomical Clock Tower, Prague Castle and Golden Lane.

Budapest, Hungary

Another top bucket list place, Budapest is a budget friendly holiday, or it can be depending on how you want to do it. I’ve heard wonderful things from friends and family who have traveled there and am intrigued by the culture, history, and public baths. Budapest has a heartbreaking history under communism and many sites to reflect on that history – the House of Terror museum, the shoes on the Danube bank, and Memento Park to name a few. It also has beautiful relics from other periods in history, including Buda Castle and the Parliament House. Like many Eastern European cities, it’s a mix of old, Soviet, and new architecture representing the heartbreaking and the heartwarming complex history of the region. Budapest, as a tourist friendly city, also has an incredibly fun vibe to it, with a hectic nightlife and Spa Baths that turn into Party Baths at night. All in all, there are a variety of experiences to have in Budapest, making it top of my 2020 list.

Spain

Coming from London, Spain is another accessible holiday for me, and I’ve never been. I’ve had friends live in different cities of Spain so I’m a bit torn on which cities I would want to visit and how much time to spend in each city. Whether Barcelona, Madrid, Malaga, Seville, or so many others, I definitely want to make it to Spain sometime this year. Finally put the fourteen years of taking Spanish to use! Spain has some amazing coastal cities, so this could be a warm holiday away from the usual dreary English weather. Flights can be cheap, but Conor and I could also drive his Prius from London (a fun roadtrip through France), making it another environmentally friendly destination.

Thailand

Thailand makes the list as a top bucket list place for any year. Depending on how the first half of my year goes, Thailand may or may not be in the cards for this year. However, flights from London can be under £500 roundtrip and when in country it can be quite inexpensive, so this could be a relatively budget friendly vacation for those of you looking for a warm and different getaway. I would love to visit some of the islands of Thailand, get out of Bangkok as quickly as possible. It would be good for some real R&R, maybe even taking a digital detox while there. Additionally, I have always wanted to visit an elephant sanctuary (one where people don’t ride them and they aren’t exploitative) as elephants have always been my favourite animal and I just want to get up close and personal with one. I also want to experience new cuisine and a different culture. Thailand would put me on a whole new continent and I would like to spend a couple weeks there. As I work from home, I could potentially work from Thailand, thus not needing to take holiday time off for at least some of the trip.

Alaska, United States

I have been to 46 states, missing Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Alaska. I would love to get up to Alaska when I’m home in California in December. During the winter there wouldn’t be much sunlight, but it would be the perfect time to see the Northern Lights, which I’ve always wanted to do. I could go to northern Europe to see the Northern Lights, but if I’m already in California then the trip to Alaska makes more sense. Alaska also has some good skiing and nature. It would be a good, relaxing end to 2020. However, it would probably be the last holiday I book as it’s a bit rogue and at the end of the year when I’m lowest on vacation days and funds. So we shall see.

This list only scratches the surface of places I want to go and things I want to do, but it’s a start. Hopefully, it has inspired you to start thinking about your 2020 vacation plans and even to check out some of these destinations. I would suggest joining a Facebook group for traveling if you want more inspiration or recommendations. As always, I’ll be updating my blog with my travels, tips, tricks, and recs throughout the year as I start crossing some of these destinations off my list.

Dana’s Do’s:

  1. Start thinking about your vacation plans early to get the best deals.
  2. Try something new – a new country, city, continent, experience.
  3. Make the most of your vacation days by using weekends and bank holidays strategically.

2020 Must Have Carry-On Items

After taking multiple long-haul and short-haul flights in 2019, I have decided to make a definitive list of the carry-on items essential to having a good flight in 2020. I have had my fair share of amazing flights and crappy flights over the years and am constantly updating my plane plan. I have found that the more prepared I am for the type of trip I am taking, the better the flight goes. Even so, some things are out of my control, so I try to plan for those as best I can. The 8 essential items on the list below have never failed me before, and have saved me more times than I can count. I hope they can help you too.

Eye Mask

I used to think having an eye mask wasn’t essential even if I was planning to sleep on the flight. Then, on a the overnight flight from Dallas to London, Conor was seated in the middle seat directly below the glaring light of the seatbelt sign. Because it was such a turbulent flight, the seatbelt sign was on for the majority of the flight, making it impossible for him to get any sleep. An absolute nightmare. Since not all planes are built the same, it would be a good idea to pack an eye mask just in case you find yourself in a situation like this. Or if your seat partner decides to read through the night with their light on. Or if you’re trying to adjust to your destination’s time zone and need to sleep while the plane is still lit. There are a variety of reasons why an eye mask is essential. So in 2020, I will be packing one for every trip.

Neck Pillow

Another item that most people pack, but those who don’t really regret. If you are tight on space, there are inflatable neck pillows – my brother gifted my sisters and me Hoodies Pillows for Christmas one year, an inflatable neck pillow with a hood, thank you Shark Tank. When not using it to sleep, I sometimes use it to cushion my back or I’ll sit on it for extra cushion in the not so comfy Economy seats. Either way, I have come to swear by neck pillows.

Layers

Planes are like movie theatres – they are always colder than you think they are going to be. Planes are always boiling when you get on, but within the first hour they are freezing. For this reason, I always wear layers, whether is a sweatshirt or cardigan, there is always something to put on or take off. This could also be important if the destination you are flying to has a different climate from your origin. The worst is flying from San Diego in shorts and a t-shirt to Ohio in the winter. Or vice versa, so be prepared.

4-Wheeled Luggage

I cannot stress this enough, I love my 4-wheel carry-on suitcase. I have never been a duffle bag flyer, my shoulders could not handle it. Two-wheeled luggage is fine, until you’ve experienced 4-wheeled luggage. The difference is in control and movement. 4-wheels allows you to keep your suitcase close, no one tripping over it behind you. And it allows you to move quickly in crowded airports (a must if you’ve ever been in a customs line). It also requires practically no effort to move at all, even better. If you’re in the market for new luggage, definitely go with 4-wheeled luggage.

Reusable Water Bottle

Flying dehydrates you, a lot. This causes worse jet lag symptoms. And yet, airlines only serve you like 4oz of water at a time. And I kind of feel like an asshole asking for the entire litre bottle of water from the flight attendant. So, I always bring a reusable water bottle with me. Obviously it needs to be empty to get through security. After that, you can fill it up at a water fountain or any airport restaurant. Once I’m on the plane, I also order water from the flight attendants whenever I can and make sure to finish my bottle before we land. I refill it at the next airport. This has also saved me from buying large plastic water bottles at the airport – saving money and the environment. Reusable water bottles are essential to offset jet lag and stay hydrated.

Book

I ALWAYS bring a book on flights, even if I think I won’t read it because I’ll be watching movies or sleeping. I felt redeemed in my choice on my last flight from London to San Francisco when my in-flight entertainment system didn’t work for the entire ten-hour flight. I was also landing in the early evening so I didn’t want to sleep in order to start resetting my body clock. Luckily I had my book. Thank God for that book or I would’ve have literally gone crazy. It got me through five hours of the flight (a nap, yoga, and some Sudoku got me through the rest). Thus, having a book is a 2020 carry-on essential.

Dramamine

Personally, I don’t suffer from motion sickness due to turbulence, but I have flown with friends and family that do, or who can’t sleep because of turbulence. I have found that Dramamine (the original kind that makes you drowsy) works best on long flights. Because it causes drowsiness, it not only helps with the turbulence but also with falling asleep. I wouldn’t recommend for flights shorter than 4 hours because you could feel groggy from it (there are non-drowsy options for motion sickness), but for long flights definitely.

Headphones

These are essential to any flight. Most planes will give out headphones that work for their entertainment system, but you should bring your own headphones that work for your entertainment, such as a phone or iPod. Usually I’ll wear headphones while I sleep with no music because they act as a noise blocker (alternatively, you could pack ear plugs). But also, when I’ve run out of things to do, listening to music helps pass the time (back to the London to SFO flight, I passed a couple hours listening to Hamilton). Usually though (and regrettably), headphones are always the first thing I forget to pack, leaving them on the counter before I leave. For this reason, they have made my 2020 carry-on essentials list and my resolution is to not forget them.

Dana’s DO’s:

  1. Plan your carry-on items before packing.
  2. Adapt to how much luggage you’ll be taking.
  3. Better to be prepared than bored for a ten hour flight.

Bonus: Wake Up Essentials Kit

This one is especially for long-haul flights. After spending 8+ hours on a plane, I feel really gross, from my skin to my hair to my clothes. Because of this, I developed my own wake-up essentials kit. In it I pack face wipes, travel size moisturiser (important to keep your skin hydrated), CC cream (to give me color), mascara, a travel-sized toothbrush/toothpaste set, and a comb. I also pack deodorant and an extra pair of undies. I use the kit either on the plane before we land or in the bathroom in baggage claim. It helps me to feel refreshed and off to a good start on any vacation. I usually only need it for long-haul flights, but I pack a version of it for short flights as well. It will continue to be a 2020 travel essential.

After a 10 hour flight, I was greeted by my 70lb lap dog at the airport!

Little Weekend in Lisbon, Portugal

With one month to go until final exams in Cambridge, I decided to take a short weekend trip to Lisbon, Portugal. One of my best friends from Ohio State University studied abroad in Senegal this past semester and we decided to meet up for a fun weekend away before she flew home to Boston for the summer!

Lisbon has gorgeous weather for the middle of May. Warm but I still brought a light jacket with me as it could get windy in certain parts of the city.

We booked an Airbnb in the heart of the city, just up the street from Marques de Pombal Sqaure. It was in a quiet residential building just blocks away from the bustling promenade.

Unfortunately, I missed my flight on Friday morning out of Stansted, which you can read about in a separate post! I was able to get on a later flight, arriving Friday night. That put a little wrench in our plans for the first day, but Amanda managed to see the Textile Museum and walked around the streets of Alfama.

When I arrived, we went for dinner at Time Out Market around 10pm. It was late but the place was absolutely packed. It’s a warehouse transformed into a marketplace with a bunch of food and drink stalls lining the outside of a massive rectangle filled with tables upon tables of people enjoying dinner and drinks. We had burgers and a pitcher of Sangria! I definitely recommend Time Out Market. There are so many options for food, ranging from seafood, to burgers, to a hog roast!

Delicious burger from Time Out Market!

On Saturday, it was an national holiday so all the museums and heritage sites had free entrance, so the city was very crowded! Amanda and I walked around the city, a total of 10.2 miles for the day. First we walked down to the market in Rossio Square. It was a small market with a few stalls from which we tasted some cheese and fruits.

Then we continued to walk down to the coast, stopping in the Praca de Comercio, a large square near the water with a massive archway and restaurants and shops lining the perimeter. We took a few pictures here and continued walking along the coast and up the hills to the Castle of Sao Jorge. The line to get in to the castle was massive so we skipped that and kept exploring the streets of Lisbon.

We took a short break to eat lunch at a cute cafe overlooking the city. I had sushi and Amanda had a seafood risotto, both were so tasty! We had a glass of wine and toasted to being in Lisbon and to having a fun, relaxing weekend.

We continued on our way, exploring the streets and hills of Lisbon. I am obsessed with the tiled buildings and all of the colors! Lisbon is absolutely beautiful and definitely worth walking through just to see all the different designs.

We ubered to Belem Tower, which was a bit of a wait but totally worth it to see the historical site and the views from it overlooking the water! Getting to the top of the tower was a pain because of the way the stairs work. The way up is the same way down so there was a three minute period when people could either go up or down, alternating. When we got to the top of the tower there was a line snaking around the whole area of people waiting to go down. We waited thirty minutes, but at least we got to enjoy the views.

After Belem Tower, we walked back to the center of town. We walked past the Archaeology Museum and the famous monastery! In front of both of these, there was a massive cultural parade happening. All the signs were in Portuguese, so I am not quite sure what was going on. Some of the participants were dressed up as witches and devils, but others were dressed in more contemporary clothing. There was loud music, singing, and dancing. Down the street, we stopped at the famous Pasteis de Belem for drinks and pastries. The pastries were delicious and definitely worth the wait! The restaurant is massive and every seat was taken with lines out the front doors, but it is one of the must go places in Lisbon!

We walked back to the center of town and back to our Airbnb where we changed for dinner and freshened up. We went to PARK for drinks at sunset overlooking the city. This bar was recommended to us by a friend who had recently visited Lisbon. We walked to the bar, which was a little difficult to find at first. The bar is on the top floor of a parking garage! Pretty cool and different. It was packed because of course everyone wants to see the sun set from a rooftop bar. And we were not disappointed.

Reminded me a bit of San Francisco!

After drinks we went back to Time Out Market for dinner because it was a short walk down the road. On our way we passed a bunch of bars that looked like fun so we bookmarked those streets for the next night! At Time Out, we ate at different stalls, but the sangria was so good that we had some more! We got back to the Airbnb a little earlier than Friday night because we had an early morning planned for Sunday!

Sunday morning we headed down to the train station, bought tickets, and took the train to Sintra. The round trip tickets cost 5 euros! Great deal! The train ride was about half an hour and passed quickly. Once we got to Sintra the bus tickets to Pena Palace were 6.50 and left from right outside the train station. It took about thirty minutes to get up to the palace. Tickets into the palace were another 7.50 for the student concession. We hiked up the hill to the palace that sat at the very top of the hill (good shout because after that walk I can’t imagine anyone wanting to invade this castle). The palace was gorgeous! So many bright colors and fun tiles. We walked around the whole thing, climbing some stairs and walking along the outer walls. We ate lunch at a cafe in downtown Sintra next to the train station as we waited for our train.

After Sintra, we trained back to Lisbon and took a short nap in the Airbnb. Then we went out and walked through more of the town. We found some small markets in different areas with stalls that sold fresh food, jewelry, and hand bags. I bought Conor cooking salt from one of the stalls that smelled so delicious! For dinner we went to another restaurant, Lost In, that overlooked the city at sunset. We ate tapas style- a cheese board, oysters, chicken ramen soup, and salad with a large pitcher of sangria. I definitely recommend this place! If you want to sit inside you will need a reservation, but the back patio was great because the weather was nice and the seating was really comfortable!

After dinner, we went back to the same area from the previous night that we had passed. It was full of bars and popping with young people. We went to a couple different bars, one was a tequila bar which was fun. The staff were playing the live show of Marc Anthony on the television and speakers. The bartender was singing along and it was a fun vibe! Then we walked up a hill to a bar with live music where we tried Ginja for the first time. It’s a Portuguese liquor and we had seen it around for the past three days, so we finally bit the bullet and tried it. It comes in a shot glass but it is meant to be sipped. It kind of tasted like licorice, but a little sweeter even. Not something I would order again, but definitely glad I tried it!

On Monday, we had a quick breakfast at Stanislaw before I left to catch my mid-morning flight. Stanislaw was a cute, green healthy looking cafe that we walked past on our way to the cafe we originally had picked for breakfast. It looked to good to pass up! I definitely recommend it if you’re looking for a healthy twist to breakfast. I also had a delicious side of yogurt and granola not pictured here. To be fair, I did leave most of my salad uneaten because for some reason salad in the morning is not my thing, no matter how delicious and fresh.

My weekend in Lisbon was short but I feel like I saw so much of the city! It is definitely doable in two-three days. Any longer and I would have done another day trip or spent more time in some of Lisbon’s museums. My favorite parts of the weekend were definitely the food and walking through the hills of Lisbon. I took more pictures than I should have of colored buildings and tiled buildings that I won’t bore you with here. I was just blown away by Lisbon’s beauty I couldn’t help myself. This was one of my favorite European cities and I definitely recommend to anyone who wants to see a small part of Portugal on a long weekend away!

Travel Tips for the Untraveled

If you haven’t traveled by air before, or have and are looking for more tips, you have come to the right place! maybe. I fly at least four times a year, if not more, and most of those are long flights. So, I have a few tips and tricks for you, the untraveled. However, this list is not comprehensive, so see #2.

2. Read travel blogs.

I read a lot of travel blogs, and I travel a lot. There are so many tips and tricks to make flying easier and I am constantly looking. Many times I find things I already do, but then there are the gold mines, things I hadn’t thought of or haven’t tried.

3. Keep it simple.

There are a lot of tips and tricks out there that have you putting cords in sunglass cases, or something similar. I do not own a sunglasses case, and I am not going to go out of my way to buy one to hold cords while I travel. I try my best to keep it simple and work with what I’ve got. So, take all the advice from travel blogs with a grain of salt.

My carry-on contains deodorant, travel sized toothbrush and toothpaste, and make-up remover. I also pack all my electronics and cords in my carry-on. And snacks. That’s about it for me, give or take a few items depending on the flight and destination. I always wear leggings, a loose fitting tank, cardigan, and easy shoes. Today for example, I am wearing Birkenstocks with chinchilla themed socks, because it makes me happy. The little wins are important on long flights. And comfort is KEY.

4. Bring a reusable water bottle.

I just payed $5.59 for a water bottle in one of the airport stores. Do not make my mistakes. Bring a reusable water bottle that you can fill up once you are past security. It will save you a lot of money and keep you well hydrated for the flight.

5. Download the airline app before you get to the airport.

Airlines usually have their own apps that can do a range of things, such as flight status, check-in, and in flight entertainment. Southwest and United apps have the in-flight entertainment option, without which you will be stuck on a long haul flight with just your thoughts– no one wants that.

6. Lay out all the clothes you want to pack, and then rethink it all.

I am a notorious over-packer, it’s just who I am. So once, I have laid out all my clothes, I go back through them asking myself various questions. Do I usually wear this? Will I wear it at the destination? Does it have a specific purpose? How many variations of a white tank top do I really need? I always end up throwing 1/3 of the clothes I thought I would need back in my drawers. This helps clear up space for other essentials, cut down on baggage, and keep the weight under 50 pounds.

7. Window seat for long flights, aisle seat for short ones.

The window seat gives you more room and a built in pillow. This helps on long flights that you may want to sleep on or just have a few extra inches of wiggle room. Aisle seat for shorter flights because its harder to fall asleep, which isn’t something you want to do on a short flight (messing up your sleep schedule sucks for jet lag).

8. Bring a book. Always.

Reading a book on a flight is an easy way to stay occupied and be engrossed in a wonderful and engaging story. This can be a paperback, kindle edition, or audiobook, but it really helps the time pass. Sometimes, reading on a plane is the first book I have read for pleasure in a while. Recently I read Crazy Rich Asians, Sharp Objects, and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. The first two I picked up in the airport and the last I have on audiobook.

These are my go to tips and tricks for flying. I am sure I could come up with twenty more given more time and space, but I don’t want to bore you with the minor details of my travel life. Good luck and safe travels!